World Cup 2014

 

 

 

 

The End

The line that greeted us on Copacabana beach stretched so far that we didn’t even bother finding the end. Instead we nestled ourselves in front of the second screen. The crowd was still thin – but overwhelmingly Argentinian. A lone German stood proudly behind us in his speedos, a German flag fluttering gently beside him.

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Brasilia

 On the penultimate day of the World Cup we traveled to Brasilia for the third/fourth place play-off, between Brazil and Holland. Twelve hours in Brazil’s capital, of which I had high hopes. Brasilia is unfortunately an unrelentingly boring city. Unless you have a particular interest in tarmac and fly-overs – or you get a real kick out of grid like systems, I cannot in sound mind, possibly recommend it.

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Dream No More

Goal after goal. After goal. After goal. The Germans bellowed until their throats cracked. The Brazilians carried an empty vacant look. A look of complete astonishment – and also near complete pain. The rain hammered down around us. Brazil’s dreams had been obliterated in one astonishing half of football.

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Beauty and the Beast


The crowd held its breath. The chants of ‘Julio Cesar’ had died down. The Chilean, Gonzalo Jara, placed the ball on the penalty spot – stamping down on the turf before walking a few yards back – turning, and exhaling. He had to score. Thousands of Brazilians packed into Rua Alzira Brandão held their breath.

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Rua Alzira Brandão


We heard it before we could see it. The piercing horns, the banging drums – a steady rumble – the sounds of Brazilians doing what Brazilian seem to do best – partying – and frenzied support of their national football team.

We turned the corner and were greeted by an arch across the road. Through it we could see the crowd, already enormous. A torrent of yellow, blue and green. This is where Brazilians come to watch their football.

Welcome to Rua Alzira Brandão.

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Lapa

 Eleven games – and the goals are pouring in. Holders Spain fell spectacularly to the thunderous Dutch. The Fan Fest exploding in orange admiration. Plucky Costa Rice took down lazy Uruguay, the French survived what can only be described as murderous football from the Hondurans and a little man named Messi finally arrived. I can’t remember a much more entertaining start to a World Cup. None of the first eleven games have ended in a draw – the first time since 1950.